EDUCATION SHOULD BE RUN BY PARENTS AGAIN

Opinion

One of the key issues today is education.  Everyone should be interested in all children getting the best well rounded education available. Children are the future and it is concerning to have a growing populace that purposely remain ignorant due to the cookie cutter approach to public schools.

My question is why have the American people allowed education to become a government led agenda?

Initially, when America was young, there was no guideline for schooling. In England, schools were available for the privileged, but not the masses. 

The American spirit formed its own brand of education. Children were taught at home or in the homes of neighbors. As communities grew, the one room schoolhouse was brought into play. This building housed the school, served as a community center and often a church on Sunday.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/One-room_school

There was usually a home or a “Teacherage” close to the schools, so that male teachers’ families were close to the school and able to assist the teacher with his duties. Unmarried female teachers were usually boarded with someone in the community. 

Laura Ingalls Wilder, author of the “Little House” books, became a schoolteacher two months before her sixteenth birthday. She taught in a one room schoolhouse.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Laura_Ingalls_Wilder

The one room school system allowed for the parents and the community to decide on the curriculum and the values taught in the schools. The community that sponsored their own school would have been up in arms if anyone from the government had tried to interfere with their wishes. They accepted some guidelines, but interference would not have been tolerated.

The one room school allowed for a child to go further than his or her own age level. If the child was advanced, they could finish their lessons and listen to the next age level’s work. The community school usually only went up to the eighth grade. This provided basic education.

 If a student wanted further education, they could go to a central high school within the county or state. 

Standardized tests did not come into play until much later, if you went to school and attended and passed all of your classes, you could graduate. 

This system spawned many a leader within the United States.

My maternal Great Grandfather John Thomas Jones donated land for a two room schoolhouse here in Paulding County, Georgia. My Grandmother Clara M. Jones and her older brother Hershel Jones taught there for a period of time.

Though his scholastic career was interrupted by family needs on the farm, my Uncle Herschel returned to school later. He later completed all of his studies and graduated from Oglethorpe University. He went on to be the principal in the Paulding County school system.

Herschel Jones Middle School in Dallas, Georgia is his legacy to education, and a tribute to the power of the one room school.

Instead of relying on the government to educate children, parents need to be in charge of the local educational system. More thought needs to be given to how each parent is personally is going to provide education to their children. In this way, the values of the parents, not the government are instilled

Taking back the power of education is key to developing free thinkers.

The Federal Government’s interference has led to teaching to tests and leaving students behind on important basics, especially American History. It is an indictment of the public school system every time some reporter asks college age students questions, like who is on the $ 20 bill. The school systems have taught our young people to be ashamed of our great nation and have misled them on how our country was founded.

When school systems insist on teaching values that are contrary to the values taught at home, it is unacceptable.

It is time to take your children and their education back from those who are running their own agenda.

 

Fannin County Schools Start Back This Wednesday!

News, Rebel's Corner

BLUE RIDGE, Ga. – Fannin County Schools start back Wednesday, August 7, 2019!

The official calendar 2019 – 2020 calendar is as follows!

Note: Days for Spring Break and holidays can be used to make up days missed due to inclement weather or other reasons.

Thursday, August 1, 2019 – Tuesday, August 6, 2019: Preplanning

 

Wednesday, August 7, 2019: First day of school.

 

Monday, September 2, 2019: Labor Day Holiday, Emergency Make Up Day

 

Thursday, October 17, 2019: Early Release, Parent Teacher Conference

 

Friday, October 18, 2019: Professional Learning Day, Emergency Make Up Days

 

Monday, October 21, 2019: Holiday, Emergency Make Up Day

 

Monday, November 25, 2019 – Friday, November 29, 2019: Thanksgiving Holidays, Emergency Make Up Days

 

Monday, December 23, 2019 – Tuesday, December 31, 2019: Christmas Holidays, Emergency Make Up Days

 

Wednesday, January 1, 2020 – Friday, January 3, 2020: New Years Break, Emergency Make Up Days

 

Monday, January 6, 2020 – Tuesday, January 7, 2020: Professional Learning Day, Emergency Make Up Days

 

Wednesday, January 8, 2020: Students Return from Break

 

Monday, January 20, 2019: Martin Luther King Holiday, Emergency Make Up Day

 

Monday, February 17, 2020: Holiday, Emergency Make Up Day

 

Friday, March 13, 2020: Early Release, Parent Teacher Conference

 

Wednesday, April 1, 2020: Kindergarten Registration – BRES, EFES, & WFES

 

Friday, April 10, 2020 – Friday, April 17, 2020: Spring Break, Emergency Make Up Days

 

Friday, May 22, 2020: Last Day of School, Graduation

 

Monday, May 25, 2020: Memorial Day

 

Tuesday, May 26, 2020 – Thursday, May 28, 2020: Post Planning

 

Friday, May 29, 2020: Emergency Make Up Day
 

Testing Dates:
Sem/Final Exams: MS/FH Thursday, December 19, 2019 – Friday, December 20, 2019 & Thursday, May 21, 2020 – Friday, May 22, 2020.
 

Milestones test windows:
Winter 2019 EOC (FCHS only)
Monday, December 2, 2019 – Friday, December 13, 2019
Spring 2020 EOC (HS courses)
Monday, April 27, 2020 – Friday, May 15, 2020
Spring 2020 EOG (3rd-8th grades)
Wednesday, April 22, 2020 – Friday, May 15, 2020

 

Fannin County High School Daily Schedule: 

7:30 – 8:00 Students report to the cafeteria with breakfast being served starting at 7:40 am.

8:05 – 9:30 Block 1 Class

9:36 – 11:01 Block 2 Class

11:07 – 1:04 Block 3 Class and Lunch

1:10 – 2:35 Block 4 Class

2:40 – 3:10 FLEX Time/Block

 
West Fannin Elementary School Daily Schedule:

Pre-K
8:15 – 8:40
Breakfast
8:40 – 10:50
Academic Time
10:50 – 11:45
Lunch/Recess
11:45 – 1:30
Academic Time
1:30 – 2:00
Gross Motor Skills
2:00 – 2:45
Academic Time

Kindergarten
8:15 – 9:50
Academic Time
9:50 – 10:40
NBI/Intervention
10:40 – 11:20
Academic Time
11:20 – 12:20
Lunch/Recess
12:20 – 1:15
Activity
1:15 – 2:45
Academic Time

1st Grade
8:10 – 8:55
Academic Time
8:55 – 9:50
Activity
9:50 – 10:40
Academic Time
10:40 – 11:30
NBI/Intervention
11:30 – 12:25
Academic Time
12:25 – 1:25
Lunch/Recess
1:25 – 2:45
Academic Time

2nd Grade
8:05 – 8:55
Academic Time
8:55 – 9:50
NBI/Intervention
9:50 – 10:45
Activity
10:45 – 11:40
Academic Time
11:40 – 12:40
Lunch/Recess
12:40 – 2:45
Academic Time

3rd Grade
8:00 – 8:55
Activity
8:55 – 11:00
1st Block
11:00 – 12:00
Lunch/Recess
12:00 – 12:55
NBI/Intervention
12:55 – 3:00
2nd Block

4th Grade
8:00 – 8:50
NBI/Intervention
8:50 – 10:55
1st Block/1st and 2nd Period
10:55 – 11:50
Activity
11:50 – 12:50
Lunch/Recess
12:50 – 3:00
2nd Block/3rd and 4th Period

5th Grade
8:00 – 9:55
1st Block/1st and 2nd Period
9:55 – 11:50
2nd Block/3rd and 4th Period
11:50 – 12:35
ELA Block
12:35 – 1:25
Lunch/Recess
1:25 – 2:10
NBI/Intervention
2:10 – 3:00
Activity

 

Last-minute supply list:

 

Fannin County High School (9th – 12th grade):
#2 Pencils, Black or Blue Pens, Binder, College-ruled Notebook Paper, Colored Pencils, Highlighters (two colors), Calculator.

 

Fannin County Middle School (6th-8th grade):
2″ Binder with Divider, Notebook Paper, Composition Books, Pencils, Pens, Highlighters, Colored Pencils.

 

Blue Ridge Elementary, East Fannin Elementary, West Fannin Elementary:
Kindergarten, 1st-2nd Grade: Crayons, Glue Sticks, Pencils, Scissors, Paper, Pencil Box or Pouch
3rd-5th grade: Colored pecils, Pencils, Loose Leaf Paper, Spiral Composition Notebooks, Pencil Pouch
 
 
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Author

WFES Character Award May

West Fannin Elem

The Character Ed word for the month of May was Perseverance. The definition is “sticking with things until they are finished without giving up”

These students were chosen for consistently displaying this character trait throughout the month. Congratulations to all of you!

Pictured from left to right- Front row: Isaac White, Willow Stiles, Lennon Lee, Harrison McDonald, Addy Martin, Mia Housley, Justin Leal, and Jonah Johnson. Middle row: Lilli Potzauf, Sophia Carroll, Israel Wood, Kaylee Dyer, Konnor Housley, Marshall McDaniel, and Leksi Wollschlager. Back row: Ella Oliver, Matthew Payne, Owen Mann, Reese Lewis, Ava Acker, Nevaeh Morgan, Danica Padrutt. Not pictured: Cole Burk and Delilah Naylor

Blue Ridge Box Car Derby Raises Money for STEM

Community, Rebel's Corner

Blue Ridge, Ga – The first annual Blue Ridge Soap Box Derby raised $4,900 for Fannin County School’s STEM (Science, Technology, Engineering, and Math) program on Saturday, April 27.

The derby race was created by locals to benefit the community, specifically the children. Co-founder Brian Higgins said, “We have festivals here almost monthly, but none of them are geared toward kids, so we wanted to do something for them, and the best part is all the money goes back to them with the STEM program.”

The founders chose to donate to STEM for a couple of reasons. According to Higgins, “[Science, technology, engineering, and math] is every bit a box car  when you think about.” It takes each area to build and race a soapbox car.

Second, STEM doesn’t receive SPLOST dollars. STEM’s funding comes from the general school budget, which also pays for other school supplies.

STEM teaches students computational thinking and how to use scientific methods to solve real-world problems. The program helps children to develop technological skills to find highly-sought after jobs.

All the cars adhered to soapbox derby car standards, using only gravity as a propulsion system. Each car and driver were weighed during the race qualifying to ensure everyone had a fair chance during the derby.

Local businesses sponsored and helped the children to build over 26 cars for the derby. The participants brought their creativity to the cars’ design from that paint to the wheels.

49 drivers raced down the hill at Fannin County Middle School on a great day for it. The school even donated the cafeteria for the day, so the children and spectators would have a lunch area. Local vendors were on hand to provide food for everyone in attendance.

Broken into three divisions, drivers fell into either the 7-11, 12-17, or 18 plus age groups. The 7-11 bracket had to win two out of three races during the preliminary round. The winners from those races moved on to the single race elimination round. The 12-17 and 18 plus brackets raced only a single elimination round.

Winners for the 7-11 Division
First Place: Watson
Second Place: Pierce
Third Place: Williams

Winner for the 12-17 Division
First Place: Twiggs
Second Place: Higgins
Third Place: Preising

All winners received $250, $75, or $25, depending on where they finished in the race.

Derby organizers hope to expand the event in the future with participants from across North Georgia.

Teaching Student Leads Lesson

Fannin County High, Rebel's Corner

Students in the Teaching as a Profession pathway learn what it’s like to plan and teach a lesson for students with various disabilities. Teaching students in Mrs. Dyer’s class were assigned a learning objective to teach. Their challenge was to create an interactive lesson that would include students with and without a physical or learning disability.

In the scenario pictured, teaching student, Olivia Sisson, created and led a lesson about vowels to her fictitious kindergarten class. A couple of the students pretended to have a sight disability and Olivia did a fantastic job differentiating her lesson so that they were able to master the objective.

BEFORE TURKEY SEASON BEGINS, DO YOU NEED A HUNTER EDUCATION COURSE?

Outdoors

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE

BEFORE TURKEY SEASON BEGINS, DO YOU NEED A HUNTER EDUCATION COURSE?

SOCIAL CIRCLE, Ga. (March 18, 2019) – Do you need hunter education before you head to the woods? You have options! Hunters in need of the Georgia hunter education course can choose to go completely online or attend a classroom course, according to the Georgia Department of Natural Resources’ Wildlife Resources Division.

“In 2018, over 14,000 people completed the Georgia hunter education course – either online or in a classroom,” says Jennifer Pittman, statewide hunter education administrator with the Wildlife Resources Division. “I am glad that we can continue to offer both classroom and online options, as it gives students a choice of what works best with their schedules, especially those with time constraints.”

The four available online courses each require a fee (from $9.95 – $24.95) but all are “pass or don’t pay” courses. Fees for these courses are charged by and collected by the independent course developer. The classroom course is free of charge.  

Completion of a hunter education course is required for any person born on or after January 1, 1961, who:

  • purchases a season hunting license in Georgia.
  • is at least 12 years old and hunts without adult supervision.
  • hunts big game (deer, turkey, bear) on a wildlife management area.

The only exceptions include any person who:

  • purchases a short-term hunting license, i.e. anything less than annual duration (as opposed to a season license).
  • is hunting on his or her own land, or that of his or her parents or legal guardians.

For more information, go to https://georgiawildlife.com/hunting/huntereducation or call 770-761-3010.

REVIEW TURKEY HUNTING SAFETY TIPS BEFORE SEASON BEGINS

Outdoors

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE

REVIEW TURKEY HUNTING SAFETY TIPS BEFORE SEASON BEGINS

SOCIAL CIRCLE, Ga. (March 18, 2019) – Before you head to the woods this Spring in pursuit of a gobbler or two, the Georgia Department of Natural Resources’ Wildlife Resources Division encourages all hunters to take some time to review important turkey hunting safety tips.

“Firearms safety knowledge is critical to keeping you, and others, safe while in the woods,” advises Jennifer Pittman, statewide hunter education administrator with the Wildlife Resources Division. “In addition to firearms safety tips, hunters should review and practice safety precautions specific to turkey hunting.”

Turkey Hunting Safety Tips:

  • Never wear red, white, blue or black clothing while turkey hunting. Red is the color most hunters look for when distinguishing a gobbler’s head from a hen’s blue-colored head, but at times it may appear white or blue. Male turkey feathers covering most of the body are black in appearance. Camouflage should be used to cover everything, including the hunter’s face, hands and firearm.
  • Select a calling position that provides at least a shoulder-width background, such as the base of a tree. Be sure that at least a 180-degree range is visible.
  • Do not stalk a gobbling turkey. Due to their keen eyesight and hearing, the chances of getting close are slim to none.
  • When using a turkey call, the sound and motion may attract the interest of other hunters. Do not move, wave or make turkey-like sounds to alert another hunter to your presence. Instead, identify yourself in a loud voice.
  • Be careful when carrying a harvested turkey from the woods. Do not allow the wings to hang loosely or the head to be displayed in such a way that another hunter may think it is a live bird. If possible, cover the turkey in a blaze orange garment or other material.
  • Although it’s not required, it is suggested that hunters wear blaze orange when moving between a vehicle and a hunting site. When moving between hunting sites, hunters should wear blaze orange on their upper bodies to facilitate their identification by other hunters.

For more hunting information, visit www.georgiawildlife.com/hunting/regulations .

2019 STATEWIDE TURKEY HUNTING SEASON OPENS MARCH 23

Outdoors

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE


2019 STATEWIDE TURKEY HUNTING SEASON OPENS MARCH 23

SOCIAL CIRCLE, Ga. (March 18, 2019) – Georgia turkey hunters are ready for the season to open on Saturday, Mar. 23. The 2019 turkey hunting season should be a fair season, similar to 2018, according to the Georgia Department of Natural Resources’ Wildlife Resources Division.  

“Reproduction in 2017 was lower than the four-year average, so that could mean a lower than usual supply of 2 year-old gobblers across much of the state in 2019,” explains Emily Rushton, Wildlife Resources Division wild turkey project coordinator. “However, that lower average comes between two better years, so hopefully other age classes will remain plentiful.”

With a bag limit of three gobblers per season, hunters have from Mar. 23 through May 15 – one of the longest seasons in the nation – to harvest their bird(s).  

What should hunters expect this spring? The Ridge and Valley, Piedmont and Lower Coastal Plain should have the best success based on 2017 reproduction information. The Blue Ridge region had a poor 2017 reproductive season, but saw a significant jump in 2018, so there may be a lot of young birds in the woods. The Upper Coastal Plain saw reproduction below their five-year average for the past two years, so numbers in that part of the state may be down.

Cedar Creek and Cedar Creek-Little River WMA Hunters, take note! The 2019 turkey season will run April 6-May 15 on these properties. This is two weeks later than the statewide opening date. This difference is due to ongoing research between the University of Georgia and WRD, who are investigating the timing of hunting pressure and its effects on gobbler behavior and reproductive success. Through this research, biologists and others hope to gain insight to the reasons for an apparent population decline in order to help improve turkey populations and hunter success at Cedar Creek WMA and statewide.

Georgia Game Check: All turkey hunters must report their harvest using Georgia Game Check. Turkeys can be reported on the Outdoors GA app (www.georgiawildlife.com/outdoors-ga-app), which now works whether you have cell service or not, at gooutdoorsgeorgia.com, or by calling 1-800-366-2661. App users, if you have not used the app since deer season or before, make sure you have the latest version. More information at www.georgiawildlife.com/HarvestRecordGeorgiaGameCheck.

Hunters age 16 years or older (including those accompanying youth or others) will need a hunting license and a big game license, unless hunting on their own private land.  Get your license at www.gooutdoorsgeorgia.com, at a retail license vendor or by phone at 1-800-366-2661. With many pursuing wild turkeys on private land, hunters are reminded to obtain landowner permission before hunting.

 

Conservation of the Wild Turkey in Georgia

The restoration of the wild turkey is one of Georgia’s great conservation success stories.  Currently, the bird population hovers around 300,000 statewide, but as recently as 1973, the wild turkey population was as low as 17,000. Intensive restoration efforts, such as the restocking of wild birds and establishment of biologically sound hunting seasons facilitated the recovery of wild turkeys in every county. This successful effort resulted from cooperative partnerships between private landowners, hunters, conservation organizations like the National Wild Turkey Federation, and the Wildlife Resources Division.

The Georgia Chapter of the National Wild Turkey Federation has donated more than $4,000,000 since 1985 for projects that benefit wild turkey and other wildlife. The NWTF works in partnership with the Wildlife Resources Division and other land management agencies on habitat enhancement, hunter access, wild turkey research and education. The NWTF has a vital initiative called “Save the Habitat, Save the Hunt,” focused on habitat management, hunter access and hunter recruitment.

“Hunters should know that each time they purchase a license or equipment used to turkey hunt, such as shotguns, ammunition and others, that they are part of this greater conservation effort for wildlife in Georgia,” said Rushton.  “Through the Wildlife Restoration Program, a portion of the money spent comes back to states and is put back into on-the-ground efforts such as habitat management and species research and management.”

For more hunting information, visit www.georgiawildlife.com/hunting/regulations .   

 

Photos courtesy of Brian Vickery. After watching his older sister have two successful seasons, 7 year-old Luke is able to take his first bird during the special opportunity youth turkey hunting season.

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