Independence Day Celebrations in Fannin County

Community, Festivals, News

Blue Ridge, Ga. – While the continued concern surrounding Covid-19 has changed some of the traditions of Fannin County’s Annual Independence Day celebration, the show must go on.

Parades that usually flow through the streets of downtown Blue Ridge will be cancelled this July 4th, but the fireworks extravaganza in both Blue Ridge and McCaysville are set to take place.

 

July 3rd

The Blue Ridge Scenic Railway will be open and operating again in time for this holiday weekend. The Scenic Railway is offering the Firecracker Special train. 

According to the Fannin County Chamber of Commerce website, the train will depart downtown Blue Ridge at 7:00 p.m. and make its way to McCaysville. Passengers can enjoy the great Copper Basin Fireworks display and return to Blue Ridge by 11:00 p.m.

Visitors to the twin cities of McCaysville, Ga. and Copperhill, Tn. are invited to view the fireworks display that is set to begin shortly before nightfall. City officials in McCaysville have promised that this year’s show will be “bigger than ever”.

Downtown activities will be set up in McCaysville and Copperhill, including lots of vendors for food and things to do with the kids until the fireworks start. 

 

July 4th

The Lake Blue Ridge Civic Association will host its annual Lake Blue Ridge Fireworks. The fireworks are scheduled to begin at dusk. Suggested viewing points for this year’s display are, Morganton Point Recreation Area, from a boat in Lake Blue Ridge near the Lake Blue Ridge Dam, Lake Blue Ridge Dam as well as adjacent area by the “tower in the lake”, and the Lake Blue Ridge Marina. 

While in town for the weekend be sure to check out the Blue Ridge Mountain Arts Association (BRMAA) Smithsonian Institution Exhibit, Crossroads: Change in Rural America. This special exhibition runs through July 17.

Crossroads uses photos, objects, film, audio, and interactive technology to explore broader themes of identity, land, community, persistence, and response to change, as well as the role our rural communities have played in shaping the American cultural landscape. Crossroads encourages conversations about local history, explores the pleasures and challenges of living rural, examines how change has made an impact on our communities, and prompts discussion of goals for the future.”

You can find Independence Day celebrations in neighboring counties by clicking here : FYN Georgia News

 

Featured Image courtesy of Fannin County Chamber of Commerce

Small town tradition continues to grow : Light Up Blue Ridge and The Basin

Community
Fannin County, Georgia, Blue Ridge, McCaysville, Copperhill, The Basin, Light Up, Gingerbread Village, Santa, Tuba Christmas, Blue Ridge Business Association, Blue Ridge Scenic Railway, Art Center, Blue Ridge Mountain Arts Association

Santa and Mrs. Claus arrive in Blue Ridge.

Blue Ridge, Ga. – Nothing rings in the holiday cheer like a small town celebration! That’s why Hallmark has literally over 100 holiday-themed small town movies for its viewers, and if Hallmark were to ever need a new setting, Fannin County would not disappoint.

The City of McCaysville kicked off the festivities hosting Light Up McCaysville and Copperhill at the newly renovated Riverwalk Shops. Festivities began at 4 p.m. on Friday with visitors enjoying holiday music while shopping at local businesses.

At 7 p.m. McCaysville lit the tree. In its new location, on the terrace in front of the Riverwalk Shops, the tree along with the lighted steel truss bridge, cast a beautiful reflection on the river below, leaving spectators in awe of the stunning display.

Fannin County, Georgia, Blue Ridge, McCaysville, Copperhill, The Basin, Light Up, Gingerbread Village, Santa, Tuba Christmas, Blue Ridge Business Association, Blue Ridge Scenic Railway, Art Center, Blue Ridge Mountain Arts Association

Rain didn’t deter the crowd as the Christmas Parade made its way through downtown.

In keeping with tradition, the Blue Ridge Business Association lit up the City of Blue Ridge with its annual Light Up Blue Ridge celebration held on Saturday.

The festivities officially began as Santa and Mrs. Claus rolled into town on the Blue Ridge Scenic Railway. Hundreds lined the tracks and children of all ages cheered as the train blew its whistle to signify their arrival.

Throughout the day families enjoyed the small town wholesome feel as carollers walked the streets singing Christmas favorites and a strolling Barbershop Quartet made its way around town.

Fannin County, Georgia, Blue Ridge, McCaysville, Copperhill, The Basin, Light Up, Gingerbread Village, Santa, Tuba Christmas, Blue Ridge Business Association, Blue Ridge Scenic Railway, Art Center, Blue Ridge Mountain Arts Association

The Great Tree in downtown Blue Ridge.

Of course, what Light Up Blue Ridge celebration would be complete without Tuba Christmas, and a Tuba Christmas there was!

Visitors and locals had pictures made with Santa and visited the Gingerbread Village set up at the Art Center (Blue Ridge Mountain Mountain Arts Association), while awaiting the parade later in the evening.

The parade began at 5:30 p.m. Despite the weather, raining with brief periods of heavy rainfall, spectators lined East Main Street. Children gladly caught candy thrown from the numerous floats and vehicles. There were grinches, dancing elves, carolling snowmen, a marching band, and ending the parade was Santa wishing all a good night.

As the parade wound down the crowd made its way to the park for the lighting of the Great Tree. 

With the traditional countdown, the 27 foot tree was lit, marking that the holiday season has officially begun for Fannin County.

 

Featured Image : Light Up McCaysville and Copperhill. Courtesy of Michelle Degner (Crescent Moon Images).

Celebration of the Copper Basin. The tri-cities work together for a common goal.

Community, News

Blue Ridge, Ga. – A celebration of the progress made and a look at future plans for the tri-cities of McCaysville, Ga., Copperhill and Ducktown, Tn. was recently held at the Burra Burra Seafood restaurant. The Copper Basin RSVP Reveal gave the public a look at what can be accomplished when multiple agencies work together for one common goal.

Crowd gathered at Burra Burra Seafood to discuss the future of the Copper Basin.

Zachary Welch, Chairman of the Revitalization Committee and member of the Renaissance Steering Committee, gave thanks to the numerous individuals, businesses and organizations involved in the process. Welch enthusiastically declared, “It’s a very exciting time for our area.”

Citizens and visitors are already noticing a more welcoming feel to the towns. Streetscapes have begun in several areas, flower pots have been placed and filled, hanging floral baskets now adorn the iconic bridges, and the McCaysville mall has seen a complete makeover with numerous businesses spriningup to fill vacant spots.

One of the most notable figures that has pushed forward the revitalization of the area is McCaysville resident Mike Galinski of Galinski Enterprises. 

“Just a super guy,” Welch said introducing Galinski to the crowd. “I am so thankful to be blessed with having him come into our community, invest his time and his resources and really help kick off revitalization of our town.”

Phase One of Galinski’s vision included restoring buildings in the area both structurally and aesthetically, in his words he wanted to “bring the buildings back to life”.

“We’ve been listening to the people and what they want,” Galinski said of the direction his projects have taken, adding that he has plans to begin an ice cream parlor in the mall.

Mike Galinski and Zachary Welch discussing the progress made and the future of area.

“I want to make it family friendly,” Galinski said of the initially named ‘Happy Bear’ ice cream parlor. “If you take your kid to the Happy Bear Ice Cream, how could they not be happy?”

Also slated for the town of McCaysville is a 12,000 square foot McCaysville Event Center and music venue. This project, still in its design phase, will need to meet state approval before construction can begin. 

Galinski said of the proposed event center, “It should be able to hold a pretty large amount, but also do small parties.”

Of those on hand to celebrate the success and direction of the Copper Basin district was Speaker of the Georgia House of Representatives David Ralston.

“What a great day to be in the Copper Basin,” Ralston spoke with the excitement shared by all involved.  “I can’t tell you what it means to see the enthusiasm and pride that this community has.”

Ralston gave personal thanks to the Carl Vinson Institute of Government, a branch of the University of Georgia, who has worked with the citizens of Copper Basin to brand the area and give direction to several projects. Ralston also gave thanks to the Lyndhurst Foundation of Tennessee who funded the planning.

Ralston then addressed Galinski, who he feels has spearheaded the revitalization in the area, “Mike, thank you for your passion for this community, and your vision, and your investment, of not only your time and resources, but your creativity. You have truly been a transformative leader here.”

Senior Public Service Associate with the Carl Vinson Institute of Government, Danny Bevins, spoke of future goals for the tri-cities and the unification through branding that his team was able to create.

Speaker of the Georgia House of Representatives David Ralston celebrates the success of the area.

Details to the branding and future plans where scrutinized and thoughtfully presented in order to “tell the story” of the people and the land. The Copper Basin logos and designs are free for all to use.

Bevins said of his team’s work and the over 600 survey responses received concerning the course of the Copper Basin area, “This planning process is not our plan, it’s all your all’s plan.”

“We heard a lot about a riverwalk,” Bevins spoke of the citizens’ input and added that plans have been made to incorporate the river into the plans for McCaysville and Copperhill. The future of the river in the twin towns will host  “small gathering and sitting areas that are connected from both sides of the river, up and down”.

Other plans include a new park added as a continuation of the existing park in McCaysville, Wayfinding Signs, street and sidewalk improvements, benches and connecting walkways, and public art to enhance the feel in the area

Revitalization is undeniable in the area, and it is the hope of all involved to turn the Copper Basin district into a destination that is “Too Great For One State”.

McCaysville Mayor, Thomas Seabolt, being presented with a plan of the area.

 

Copperhill Mayor, Kathy Stewart, was also presented with a framed plan of the area.

 

Jan Hackett and David Ralston pose with a framed plan, that Ralston said would hang at the state capital.

Tourism brings big dollars to Fannin County

Community, Fannin County Chamber, News

Blue Ridge, Ga. – There is no denying that our area is a hot spot for tourists and the Fannin County Chamber of Commerce gave a 2018 update letting citizens know just how much money our thriving tourist industry is bringing to our area.

Last year alone, $39 million was collected in local lodging tax by both the City of Blue Ridge and Fannin County.

“That’s just the ones who pay the tax,” Jan Hackett, President of Fannin County Chamber of Commerce spoke of the significance of these numbers, “so anyone out there who is an Airbnb or a VRBO who is not paying the tax is not in that number.”

In recent years Georgia Tech teamed up with the Chamber of Commerce to do a study on our economic impact numbers. According to Hackett the purpose of this study was to determine the amount of dollars spent in our local economy based on the lodging taxes collected.

Georgia Tech was able to produce an equation that they felt would portray an accurate number based on percentages of sales in direct comparison with lodging taxes.

“Based on their percentages the amount of money that visitors spent directly was $170.5 million dollars,” Hackett said explaining the findings for calendar year 2018 and added that this number is based on overnight visitors alone and does not account for day trippers and our area’s population of second home owners.

According to these numbers and based on SPLOST (Special Purpose Local Option Sales Tax) collections last year, overnight visitors made up roughly a third of all retail sales in the county. SPLOST reported a record breaking $555 million is sales last year for Fannin County.

Hackett broke down the numbers into a daily average. On average per day lodging brings in $100,795 and visitors spend roughly $484,375. This equates to $39,347 of taxes collected locally.

While our county can become crowded due to the visitors, there is a definite positive impact these visitors bring with them. Roughly one-third of the jobs in Fannin County (excluding governmental) are supported by the tourist industry, and all the extra revenue saves residents approximately $865 in taxation per household.

Hackett pointed out that in 2001: “At that point in time we had less in retail sales than any county in the four around us.” These counties include Fannin, Glimer, Pickens, and Union.

Fast forward to recent years and Fannin County is now leading the way in retail sales and economic growth. A comparison shows that in 2001 retail sales were approximately $150 million and in 2018 retail sales were $555,697,658.

With the lodging tax now being split 50/50 between the chamber and the county, Hackett reported that the decrease from the 70 percent that the chamber previously received has not posed any negative effect on the ability to market our area.

Fannin County Chairman Stan Helton explains where the extra revenue the county is now getting from the split in lodging tax is being spent, “When we adjusted this ratio between the board of commissioners and the chamber, our intent was to take half of that increase and put it into safety.”

Post 1 Commissioner Earl Johnson is credited with the idea of investing the funds into public safety, and had pointed out in previous meetings that his reasoning is simply with more people visiting and more events being held in our area there becomes an increased demand for emergency services to be provided.

Up next for the Chamber of Commerce is to continue to promote growth and visitation in our area. Hackett said of moving forward, “Our mission is only to help make Fannin County a better place to live, work and play.”

The chamber has recently focused efforts into making the Copper Basin area a desirable place to visit and has teamed up with the University of Georgia Carl Vinson Institute of Government Study to produce an in depth study of McCaysville, Copperhill, and Ducktown.

“The Carl Vinson Institute is doing a kind of strategic planning process for McCaysville, Copperhill, and Ducktown….the Copper Basin,” Hackett said of the partnership and added that she is expecting the study to be complete by the end of February.

The study and planning will work to make the Copper Basin area a more appealing place to work, live and visit. Its focus is to re-brand the area. Under the name the Copper Basin Renaissance, the partnership with UGA is focusing its campaign on the slogan “Copper Basin. Too Great for One State”.

Hackett said of the chamber’s focus, “As Blue Ridge has gotten more crowded, it only makes since to try to do more in McCaysville and Copper Hill and the Basin, so that when visitors are here we’ll have them spread out in the county.”

The Fannin County Chamber of Commerce debuted a new website that went live in March of last year. 617,905 users visited the site and of those users 82 percent were new.

The new design of the website landed the chamber a prestigious Silver Adrian Award from the Hospitality Sales and Marketing Association International.

“To give you an idea of what an honor that is, the Jackson Hole Wyoming website also won a silver,” Hackett said of the accomplishment.

The Fannin County Chamber of Commerce plans to continue efforts in 2019 to once again bring in record numbers to our area and help define Fannin County as a resilient place to visit or to make home.

Featured Image: A small sample of the Fannin County Chamber of Commerce new award winning website.

 

 

Fetch Your News is a hyper local news outlet that attracts more than 300,000 page views and 3.5 million impressions per month in Dawson, Lumpkin, White, Fannin, Gilmer, Pickens, Union, Towns and Murray counties as well as Cherokee County in N.C. FYNTV attracts approximately 15,000 viewers per week and reaches between 15,000 to 60,000 per week on our Facebook page. For the most effective, least expensive local advertising, call 706-276-6397 or email us at [email protected]

Evelyn Kilpatrick: Obituary

Obituaries

Evelyn R. Kilpatrick, age 97, of Copperhill, passed away October 2, 2018, at the Life Care Center. Mrs. Kilpatrick was born July 29, 1921, in Mitchell County, GA to the late Elton Fred Rackley and the late Georgia Ackerich Rackley. She was of the Pentecostal Faith. In addition to her mother and father, Mrs. Kilpatrick was preceded in death by her husband, Jess Kilpatrick, Sr.

Survivors include a son, Jess W. Kilpatrick, Jr., two grandchildren, five great-grandchildren, and eleven great-great-grandchildren.

Graveside services will be held Thursday, October 4, 2018, at 11:00 am at the Mt. Moriah Baptist Church Cemetery in Murphy, NC, with Rev. Robert Young officiating.

Arrangements entrusted to the Finch-Cochran Funeral Home of McCaysville, GA. You may send condolences to the family and sign the guest register at www.cochranfuneralhomes.com

GDOT proposed plans for a new McCaysville-Copperhill truck route

News, Press Release

Public encouraged to attend the meeting.

Blue Ridge, Ga–  A public information open house to view the proposed project to improve State Route (SR) 5 and construct a new location truck route in Fannin County, Georgia and in Polk County, Tennessee is scheduled for Tuesday, September 11, 2018, from 4 to 7 p.m. The meeting will be held at the McCaysville Church of God, located at 1477 Blue Ridge Drive in the city of Blue Ridge, Georgia.

Residents interested in learning more about the proposed project are encouraged to attend the meeting and to visit the website at www.dot.ga.gov.

The proposed project will improve State Route 5 from Old Flowers Road to Colton Avenue by resurfacing the existing two lanes on this portion and constructing 10-foot wide shoulders with 16-inch rumble strips for driver notification of roadway departure. The proposed project will transition to two lanes with curb and gutter with 5-foot sidewalks on both sides. At the intersection of SR 5 and School Street, the project proposes the installation of a roundabout. To learn more about the benefits of roundabouts, visit http://www.dot.ga.gov/DS/SafetyOperation/Roundabouts. The proposed improvements continue northeast along the existing SR 5/Blue Ridge Drive alignment for approximately 0.4 miles to the Toccoa Avenue.

The project also proposes to construct a two-lane truck route along a new location alignment approximately 1.1 miles in length beginning at the proposed roundabout on existing SR 5 at School Street. The roadway continues northwest crossing into Tennessee, then turns to the northeast and bridges over W Tennessee Ave, the Ocoee River, the existing railroad and Tennessee SR 68/Ocoee Street. The roadway then loops around toward the southeast and ties into Tennessee SR 68/Ocoee Street near Colonial Avenue where a second roundabout is proposed.

Grant Waldrop, district engineer at the Georgia DOT office in Cartersville explains, “This meeting will provide the public with an opportunity to review the proposed project and see how the improvements will accommodate taking truck movements out of downtown McCaysville/Copperhill as well as enhance economic development opportunities within Fannin and Polk Counties and the Appalachian region by providing operational improvements along the corridor which may lessen crash frequency and severity.”

The Open House will be informal and the public is invited to attend anytime between 4 and 7 p.m.  The meeting site is accessible to persons with disabilities.  Accommodations for people with disabilities can be arranged with advance notice by calling Joseph Ciavarro at 678-721-5164.

Written statements will be accepted concerning this project until Tuesday, September 25, 2018. Written statements may be submitted to:

Mr. Eric Duff, State Environmental Administrator
Georgia Department of Transportation
Office of Environmental Services
600 West Peachtree Street, NW – 16th Floor
Atlanta, Georgia 30308

Georgia Department of Transportation plans, constructs and maintains Georgia’s state and federal highways. We’re involved in bridge, waterway, public transit, rail, general aviation, bike, and pedestrian programs. And we help local governments maintain their roads. Georgia DOT is committed to providing a safe, seamless and sustainable transportation system that supports Georgia’s economy and is sensitive to its citizens and its environment.

Roy William Ball: Obituary

Obituaries

Roy William Ball – March 10, 1949 – October 6, 2018

Visitation

OCT 9. 05:00 PM – 09:00 PM

Henry-Cochran Funeral Home

3911 Appalachian Hwy

Blue Ridge, GA, US, 30513

 

Funeral Service

OCT 10. 01:00 PM

Henry-Cochran Funeral Home

3911 Appalachian Hwy

Blue Ridge, GA, US, 30513

 

Concord Baptist Church Cemetery

Hwy 60
Morganton, GA, 30560

Johnny Wayne Deal: Obituary

Obituaries

Mr. Johnny Wayne Deal, better known as “J.W.”, passed away on October 8, 2018, at age 46. Born in Copperhill, TN he was the son of the late Thomas H. Deal, Sr. J.W. had worked in construction installing Drywall for a number of years. He loved spending time in the mountains and was an avid Hunter and Fisherman. He also had a vast knowledge of many trees, plants and flowers from his experience outdoors. He loved playing the guitar and his canine companion, Ruthy.

Survivors include his mother, Yvonne Deal of Copperhill; two brothers and their children, James Martin “Marty” Deal and sons, Jacob, Isaac and Michael Deal; Thomas “Jr.” Deal and his daughter, Taylor Marie Deal.

Graveside services will be conducted on Tuesday, October 9, 2018 at 3:00 p.m. from the Mt. Harmony Baptist Church Cemetery with Rev. David O’Neal and Rev. Clifton Patterson officiating. Music will be by Kenny O’Neal. The following gentlemen were selected to serve as pallbearers: Gary Dobbs, Channon Morrow, Nathan Smith, Jameison Hyatt, Russell Locke and Danny O’Neal. Condolences may be sent to the family online at www.akinsfuneralhome.com. Akins Funeral Home of Copperhill, TN is in charge of the arrangements.

Willard “Snuffy” Smith: Obituary

Obituaries

Willard Smith, affectionately known to family and friends as “Snuffy”, age 95, passed away peacefully Saturday, October 6, 2018, in the Erlanger Medical Center in Chattanooga, TN. Willard was born in Polk County, TN on December 27, 1922, to the late Lucius Napolean Smith and Lula Bell Bradburn. He was a Deacon at Zion Hill Baptist Church. He retired from City Services where he worked as a Crusher Operator. He served in the United States Army during World War II. He is also preceded in death by three sisters and four brothers.

Willard is survived by his niece, Betty Jo (Glen) Hughes of Turtletown; great-niece, Karen (Ronald) Martin of Turtletown; and many other nieces, nephews, and other relatives.

Funeral services will be conducted on Monday, October 8, 2018 at 3:00 pm from Zion Hill Baptist Church. Rev. Stephen Smith and Glen Hughes will officiate. Music will be provided by Glen Hughes and Ryan Norton. Interment will follow in the church cemetery with Ronald Martin, Kenny Martin, Johnny Smith, Mark Taylor, Dwight Dilbeck, and Seth Mathis serving as pallbearers. Honorary pallbearers are Rev. Bill Maughan, Doad Hughes, Glen Hughes, Doug Smith, Kenneth Martin, Rev. Stephen Smith, Terry Humberd, and the Deacons of Zion Hill Baptist Church. The family will visit with friends at the church on Monday Afternoon from 12:00 pm until the service hour of 3:00 pm. Condolences may be sent to the family online at www.akinsfuneralhome.com. Akins Funeral Home of Copperhill is in charge of the arrangements.

Helen Elizabeth Mack Taylor: Obituary

Obituaries

Helen Elizabeth Mack Taylor, age 79, of Soddy Daisy, TN, passed away Saturday, October6, 2018. Helen was born in Turtletown, TN to the late Olin and Jackie Griffith Mack. She was retired from the Interlink Corporation working as a telephone operator. She was a member of the Refuge Assembly of God Church in Soddy Daisy, TN and was preceded in death by her son, Toby Taylor.

She is survived by her husband, Robert Taylor of the home; children, Stephen Taylor of Dallas, GA, Johnathan (Marissa) Taylor of Columbus, GA, Jacqueline Michelle Chitwood of Lithia Springs, GA and Suzanna Shockley of Soddy Daisy, TN. Eight grandchildren; four great-grandchildren also survive.

Funeral services will be conducted on Monday, October 8, 2018 at 2:00 pm from the Akins Funeral Home of Copperhill Chapel with Pastor Dennis Parillo officiating. Music will be provided by Pastor Dennis and Bobbie Parillo. Interment will follow in the Zion Hill Baptist Church Cemetery. Pallbearers are Dustin Taylor, Zack Taylor, Seaver Taylor, Logan Taylor, Andrew Shockley, and Dylan Taylor. The family will visit with friends at the funeral home on Sunday Evening from 5:00 pm until 8:00 pm. Condolences may be sent to the family online at www.akinsfuneralhome.com. Akins Funeral Home of Copperhill is in charge of the arrangements.

Marlene Payne: Obituary

Obituaries

Marlene Payne, age 84, of McCaysville, GA, passed away Thursday, October 4, 2018. Mrs. Payne was born in McCaysville, GA to the late William Lloyd and Elzie Estelle Bradley Pittman. She attended Bethany Church. She was also preceded in death by her husband, R.V. Payne, daughter, Mary Lou Taylor and brother, Kenneth Pittman.

She is survived by children, Charles (Judy) Payne of McCaysville, GA, Donald (Lynn) Payne of McCaysville, GA, Linda Hancock of McCaysville, GA, Jannie (Tom) Hedden of Blue Ridge, GA; sister Eulene (Melvin) Harper of Mineral Bluff, GA. Seventeen grandchildren; twenty-six great grandchildren; four great-great grandchildren.

Funeral services were conducted Sunday, October 7, 2018 at 4:00 p.m. from the Akins Funeral Home of Copperhill Chapel with Preacher Jimmy Dickey officiating. Music was by April Jones. Pallbearers included Cody Knight, Riley Hedden, Chris Prince, Chad Allen, Ryan Knight and Tyler Allen. Interment followed in the Mt. Liberty Baptist Church cemetery. Condolences to the family may be sent online to akinsfuneralhome.com. Akins Funeral Home of Copperhill was in charge of the arrangements.

Edith Sue Branyon: Obituary

Obituaries

Edith Sue Branyon, age 77, of Ducktown, TN passed away Wednesday, October 3, 2018. Mrs. Branyon was born in Gastonia, NC to the late Elmer and Pauline Burger Taylor. She was a member of the Victory Temple Holiness Church. She was also preceded in death by her husband, James Branyon and brothers, Harold Taylor and Charlie Taylor, sister Dorothy Taylor.

She is survived by her children, Perry (Renee) Branyon of Blairsville, GA, James W. (Milisa) Branyon of Magnolia, TX, Linda (Gilbert) Johnson of Farner, TN; Brothers, Abe Taylor of Turtletown, TN, Tommy Taylor of Turtletown, TN, Junior Taylor of McCaysville, GA, Leroy Taylor of Rome, GA; sisters, Joy Davis of Ellijay, GA, Opal Loudermilk of Calhoun, GA; five grandchildren; eleven great-grandchildren.

Funeral services were conducted Sunday, October 7, 2018 at 1:00 p.m. from the Akins Funeral Home of Copperhill Chapel with Rev. Frank Jalbreath and Bro. Randall Nicholson officiating. Music was by Randall & Joel Nicholson. Pallbearers included Abe Taylor, Daniel Johnson, Tim Johnson, Jonathan Branyon, Micah Branyon and Samuel Branyon. Interment followed in the New Hope Holiness Church Cemetery. Condolences to the family may be sent online to akinsfuneralhome.com. Akins Funeral Home of Copperhill was in charge of the arrangements.

Update: Boil advisory for McCaysville, Copperhill water customers

News

McCAYSVILLE, Ga. – UPDATE: In addition to McCaysville water customers, the city of Copperhill has issued a boil advisory for its water customers. According to Amber Brooks, city clerk for Copperhill, the advisory stems from low levels in the city’s water tank. Brooks added the city is hauling water from the Copper Basin Utility District water system in Ducktown, Tennessee, to fill the city tank.

Water customers of the city of McCaysville, which supplies water to the Copperhill water system, also remain under a boil advisory that was originally issued Friday.

 

McCAYSVILLE, Ga. – The Fannin County Emergency Management Agency (EMA) announced a boil advisory Friday, Jan. 5, for McCaysville water customers.

“Due to freezing pipes and low tank levels, all customers on the McCaysville Water System are under a boil advisory until further notice,” the Fannin EMA advisory read.

The McCaysville water system has experienced water main breaks in the past few days due to extremely cold temperatures. This, along with customers leaving faucets dripping overnight to prevent freezing, has led to low tank levels at the city’s water system tank.

Continue to follow FetchYourNews for updates on the water situation in the twin cities.

 

 

Author

Jason Beck

Born in Merrillville, Indiana, raised in Cleveland, Tennessee, and currently resides in Copperhill, Tennessee. Graduated from Bradley Central High School in 1996 and attended the University of Tennessee at Chattanooga, eventually earning a B.A. and M.A. in English. Hobbies include hiking, camping and fly-fishing. Interests include baseball, hockey and cliff jumping.

McCaysville lights up the twin cities Christmas Tree

Community

McCAYSVILLE, Ga. – There was no denying the Christmas spirit this past weekend in Fannin County and surrounding areas.

Fannin County, Georgia, McCaysville, Copperhill, Tennessee, Mayor, Thomas Seabolt, Kathy Stewart, Christmas, Kiwanis, Christmas Parade

The lighting of the McCaysville Christmas Tree.

With Thanksgiving officially past, it is acceptable etiquette to move forward with the Christmas season, and McCaysville did just that on Friday, Nov. 24, with the annual lighting of the city Christmas tree.

Residents and tourists alike gathered near the post office to partake in the evening’s events. Live music was provided with many in the crowd singing and dancing to their favorite yule time tunes.

Hot chocolate was served, and Santa was present to have pictures made with children, adults and four-legged family members.

The mood was set for the lighting of the city Christmas Tree at 6 p.m. As the music fell silent, McCaysville Mayor Thomas Seabolt and Copperhill, Tennessee Mayor Kathy Stewart had the honor of lighting the 2017 twin cities Christmas Tree.

Cheers came from the crowd below as the tree was lit, and dancing continued into the evening.

The cities of McCaysville and Copperhill will host the 96th Annual Kiwanis Christmas Parade on Saturday, Dec. 2, at 2 p.m.

[cincopa AYHADKe4WkvT]

 

Fetch Your News is a hyper local news outlet that attracts more than 300,000 page views and 3.5 million impressions per month in Dawson, Lumpkin, White, Fannin, Gilmer, Pickens, Union, Towns and Murray counties as well as Cherokee County in N.C. FYNTV attracts approximately 15,000 viewers per week and reaches between 15,000 to 60,000 per week on our Facebook page. For the most effective, least expensive local advertising, call 706-276-6397 or email us at [email protected]

Update: First Baptist of McCaysville/Copperhill to move services temporarily after Tuesday fire

Religion

McCAYSVILLE, Ga. – Rev. Matthew McDaniel, senior pastor of First Baptist Church (FBC) of McCaysville/Copperhill, announced Thursday that Sunday 11:00 a.m. services will temporarily move to the Akins Funeral Home Chapel in Copperhill after a fire damaged portions of the church’s balcony Tuesday afternoon, Jan. 2.

Grey smoke billows from steeple of First Baptist Church of McCaysville/Copperhill during a small fire Tuesday.

Akins Funeral Home of Copperhill is located at 823 Ocoee Street in Copperhill, Tennessee, about a mile and a half north of town on Tennessee Hwy. 68.

“Due to the longer process of cleanup and repair we are moving our 11:00 Worship services to Akins Funeral Home Chapel in Copperhill,” Pastor McDaniel explained in a statement. “We will have no (Sunday) evening services until return to our sanctuary in approximately four to six weeks. All Wednesday activities will resume as normal at the FBC Campus.”

 

Fetch Your News is a hyper local news outlet that attracts more than 300,000 page views and 3.5 million impressions per month in Dawson, Lumpkin, White, Fannin, Gilmer, Pickens, Union, Towns and Murray counties as well as Cherokee County in N.C. FYNTV attracts approximately 15,000 viewers per week and reaches between 15,000 to 60,000 per week on our Facebook page. For the most effective, least expensive local advertising, call 706-276-6397 or email us at [email protected]

Author

Jason Beck

Born in Merrillville, Indiana, raised in Cleveland, Tennessee, and currently resides in Copperhill, Tennessee. Graduated from Bradley Central High School in 1996 and attended the University of Tennessee at Chattanooga, eventually earning a B.A. and M.A. in English. Hobbies include hiking, camping and fly-fishing. Interests include baseball, hockey and cliff jumping.

Boil advisories continue for McCaysville, Copperhill

News

McCAYSVILLE, Ga. – UPDATE: Amber Brooks, city clerk for the city of Copperhill, and the McCaysville City Hall automated alert system confirmed Wednesday, Jan. 17, that the boil advisories for both towns’ water customers remain in effect as frozen and broken lines in the McCaysville water system has resulted in low tank levels for each town’s water systems.

Brooks stated Copperhill city workers are still transporting water from Copper Basin Utility District hydrants in nearby Ducktown, Tennessee, in an effort to fill the city’s water system tanks and are also working to establish an emergency line connection with Copper Basin Utility District. The city of Copperhill currently receives its water from the McCaysville water system.

For both towns, the latest boil advisory is the third such advisory since early October last year. The McCaysville advisory, issued Jan. 5, is in its 13th consecutive day while the Copperhill advisory is in its 12th.

 

UPDATE: Suzanne Hughes, city recorder for the city of Copperhill, and a Fannin County Emergency Management Agency alert confirmed the continuation of the boil advisories for Copperhill, Tennessee, and McCaysville, Georgia, respectively, Friday, Jan. 12. Both advisories remain in effect until further notice and are expected to last throughout the weekend.

 

A boil advisory remains in effect for McCaysville water customers Thursday, Jan. 11.

The city has been under the advisory since Friday, and the latest advisory is the city’s third boil advisory for its water customers since the beginning of October 2017. The advisory stems from low tank levels at the city’s water plant, which occurred largely because of broken water mains during the recent cold weather experienced across the region over the past two weeks, according to McCaysville City Councilman and Water Commissioner Richard Wagner.

Wagner was unable to give timetable for when the boil advisory is expected to be lifted and added that tank levels at the water plant continue to be low.

“(City water crews) have worked hard (to repair the broken mains) and put in a lot of long hours, and I am very proud of them,” Wagner stated of the recent water system repair work throughout the city.

Consequently, the city of Copperhill, Tennessee, which receives its water from the McCaysville water system, also issued a boil advisory for its customers Saturday, Jan.6, which remains in effect for its customers, according to City Clerk Amber Brooks. Currently, Copperhill is using fire engines and tankers to transfer water from Copper Basin Utility District hydrants in nearby Ducktown, Tennessee, in an effort to keep its own water tank full, Brooks stated. For Copperhill, this is also its third boil advisory since October.

Before boil advisories can be lifted, a series of bacteriological testing must be conducted to ensure the safety of water and the water providers must receive clearance from the state.

Author

Jason Beck

Born in Merrillville, Indiana, raised in Cleveland, Tennessee, and currently resides in Copperhill, Tennessee. Graduated from Bradley Central High School in 1996 and attended the University of Tennessee at Chattanooga, eventually earning a B.A. and M.A. in English. Hobbies include hiking, camping and fly-fishing. Interests include baseball, hockey and cliff jumping.

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