Fannin County Governmental Departments recap 2018

Community, News

Blue Ridge, Ga. – At the most recent Board of Commissioners (BOC) meeting, the public got to hear first hand the accomplishments of several departments within the Fannin County government.

Among the departments represented was the Blue Ridge Mountains Arts Association, Land Development, Animal Control, Emergency Management Agency, Fire Department, Recreation Department, and Public Works.

BLUE RIDGE MOUNTAINS ARTS ASSOCIATION (BRMAA)

BRMAA saw over 38,000 visitors in 2018. The economic benefits of having this many visitors to the area are estimated to be $493,000 locally and $1.1 million for the region.

“These numbers are based on Georgia Council for the Arts as well as Americans for the Arts Economic Operations,” BRMAA Executive Director Nichole Potzauf said explaining how economic impact is decided.

The Art Center hosted 37 exhibits and events in 2018 and was awarded the 2018-19 Vibrant Communities Grant from the Georgia Council for the Arts.

Fannin County, Georgia, Blue Ridge, Board of Commissioners, Chairman, Post One Commissioner, Post Two Comissioner, Stan Helton, Earl Johnson, Glenn Patterson, Departments, Department Heads, Update, Blue Ridge Mountains Arts Association, BRMAA, Land Development, Animal Control, Emergency Management Agency, Fire Department, Parks and Recreation, Public Works, Director, Animal Control Officer, Chief Officer, Fire Chief, Deputy Director, Fannin County Attorney, Nichole Potzauf, Marie Woody, John Drullinger, Darrell Payne, Larry Thomas, Eddie O'Neal, Zack Ratcliff

Visitors to the Art Center for one of the many exhibits hosted throughout the year.

The Vibrant Communities Grants helps to support single art projects in Georgia. These projects could include an art exhibit, a theater production, a series of workshops for children, or an artist residency.

Potzauf said of the intentions for the grant’s use, “We’re utilizing that to begin a program call the Appalachian Initiative Grant Program and we are focusing on Appalachian craft and culture.” She listed some examples including weaving and bee keeping.

Along with the exhibits and events, the Art Center also hosted 4198 students that attended one of their 190 classes offered.

There was a notable success from the annual Cork and Canvas fundraiser as well.

“All the proceeds from this event benefit our youth programming. In 2018, based on just that fundraiser alone we were able to provide $2,000 in youth scholarships, some art classes as well as college advancement for any student that is advancing their career in the college arts,” Potzauf said of this event, and reminded everyone that the 2019 Cork and Canvas fundraiser is approaching and will be held on March 29.

Expect to see a one of a kind exhibit displayed between April and June of 2020 as it makes its way across the state of Georgia.

While no specific details were given Potzauf did say of the future exhibit, “We have been selected as one of six cities in the state of Georgia to represent the Smithsonian exhibit that will be coming here to celebrate rural communities throughout the United States.”

Currently the Art Center is displaying over 1,800 pieces of artwork and is open to the public Tuesday through Sunday 10 a.m. to 6 p.m.

FANNIN COUNTY LAND DEVELOPMENT

The Land Development department saw 270 building permits in 2018. This number is slightly down from 2017. Along with the building permits there were 16 Erosion and Sedimentation Control Plans, 5 new residential developments, 2 private commercial developments, 2 apartment applications, 2 church developments, 2 assisted living developments, 1 school development, and 1 tiny home/RV park development.

One of the largest issues facing the Land Development department is the ongoing matter of litter control.

“I get about one or two calls a week about garbage. Sometimes it’s easy and I find the name in it and sometimes I can run down those folks and sometimes I can’t,” Chief Land Development Officer Marie Woody addressed the complications in combating the littering problem in Fannin County.

According to Woody, while there are fines in place for Fannin County residents who dump trash on the side of roadways when it comes to residents from out of state, if found, little or nothing can be done.

Those that litter in Fannin County or dump garbage on the side of the roadways and are from Tennessee or North Carolina often get off with no consequences because Woody simply does not have the jurisdiction to fine them.

Fannin County, Georgia, Blue Ridge, Board of Commissioners, Chairman, Post One Commissioner, Post Two Comissioner, Stan Helton, Earl Johnson, Glenn Patterson, Departments, Department Heads, Update, Blue Ridge Mountains Arts Association, BRMAA, Land Development, Animal Control, Emergency Management Agency, Fire Department, Parks and Recreation, Public Works, Director, Animal Control Officer, Chief Officer, Fire Chief, Deputy Director, Fannin County Attorney, Nichole Potzauf, Marie Woody, John Drullinger, Darrell Payne, Larry Thomas, Eddie O'Neal, Zack Ratcliff

(L-R) Steve Oakley, Marie Woody, Jane Oakley. The three have worked closely to propose a Fannin county clean up program.

Post 1 Commissioner Earl Johnson expressed his feelings that a majority of the trash he encounters along the roadways is bulk, and expressed holding the garbage haulers in the county more responsible.

“Is there something in our ordinance where someone has to identify themselves as a garbage hauler?” Johnson questioned Woody about possible solutions. “I know for four years it’s been a huge issue. It just seems like this last year, maybe two years, there’s just a lot more private haulers.”

After brief discussion the members of the Board of Commissioners and Fannin County Attorney Lynn Doss, all agreed to review the county’s current ordinances and look into the possibility of having private haulers register.

Woody, along with Fannin County residents Steve and Jane Oakley presented the county with a vision to start an “Adopt the Mountains” program.

The program, still in its conceptual phase, will aim to curb littering through education, and will work to get citizens more involved in area clean-ups.

Fannin County Chairman Stan Helton praised the Oakleys for their willingness to get involved: “I’m personally very grateful for citizens that step up and are willing to get their hands in the soup, so to speak. It’s a never ending battle and it takes a lot of people to make that effort to see some results.”

When questioned by the Fannin County Post 2 Commissioner Glenn Patterson about an education program for high school age children, Woody replied that she thought it would be better to focus the educational programs on younger children.

“I think we need to teach the children, not the teenagers,” Woody said responding to Patterson’s question. “When you get into the teenage years, you’re kind of set in what you’re going to do, but if we start ingraining it into the children maybe kindergarten, first, second grade; if we can educate them I think that would be your best bet. Then they could educate mom and dad.”

Woody said that the educational program could go hand in hand with the proposed Spring Clean Up outlined in the Oakley’s program.

Along with the new programs hoped to be initiated in the county, Woody will be seeking another Tire Grant clean up.

In 2018, a tire removal project was implemented through use of this grant and was met with great success. Woody is hoping to continue this momentum in the county.

Finally Woody would like to see Fannin County’s Adopt a Road program revamped. Advanced Disposal has agreed to pick up specific colored bags along the roadways where citizens have collected litter.

FANNIN COUNTY ANIMAL CONTROL

Fannin County Animal Control (FCAC), Animal Control Officer, John Drullinger updated the BOC with the work that his department had accomplished in 2018.

Last year, FCAC took in 405 dogs and puppies. Of the 405 that were taken in 118 were reclaimed by owners, 83 were adopted out of the facility, and 189 were pulled by various animal rescues.

Drullinger spoke of the improvements done to the FCAC facility in 2018: “Without a doubt one of the biggest ones was the completion of the 13 outside dog kennels. Which improved both the animals lives and ours as well.”

According to Drullinger this addition to the facility has made a vast improvement on the reduction of noise, and has added greatly to the safety of employees as they now can more easily get into kennels for disinfecting.

Fannin County, Georgia, Blue Ridge, Board of Commissioners, Chairman, Post One Commissioner, Post Two Comissioner, Stan Helton, Earl Johnson, Glenn Patterson, Departments, Department Heads, Update, Blue Ridge Mountains Arts Association, BRMAA, Land Development, Animal Control, Emergency Management Agency, Fire Department, Parks and Recreation, Public Works, Director, Animal Control Officer, Chief Officer, Fire Chief, Deputy Director, Fannin County Attorney, Nichole Potzauf, Marie Woody, John Drullinger, Darrell Payne, Larry Thomas, Eddie O'Neal, Zack Ratcliff

A volunteer working one-on-one with a dog at FCAC helps to improve the odds of adoption.

“Our new volunteer program has been a huge success. We’ve got some days up to 10 or 12 volunteers down there walking our dogs, helping clean, do laundry, work with some of the shy dogs, some of the fearful ones, teaching them tricks,” Drullinger said of the recently implemented program. “Some of our volunteers are doing legs of transports helping move some of the dogs out, helping rescues.”

Johnson spoke of the volunteers at FCAC improving the cause, “The other people that have been getting involved here recently, I hope they keep it up , keep the interest.”

“We have a great group of people. Some come pretty regular, some come on certain days, some come everyday. They are very motivated and willing to help out,” Drullinger affirmed Johnson’s thoughts and added that the FCAC donor program has been a huge success as well with people donating items such as blankets, towels, toys and treats for the dogs.

The local area animal rescues were acknowledged for their help in moving dogs out of the facility and into permanent homes. A new group, Team Dahlonega, has also stepped up, helping to advertise the dogs held at FCAC and raise pledges for individual dogs to be pulled into rescues.

Drullinger said of Team Dahlonega’s efforts, “That’s been instrumental in helping us with our rescues, that have already been helping us move out a lot more dogs.”

The efforts of the volunteers, rescues and staff are noticeable. As of this update there were only six dogs in the facility. Drullinger said of this accomplishment, “That’s lowest number that has ever been there since I’ve been there.”

Drullinger closed his update with a reminder: “I would like to remind the public about ID-ing their dogs. If we had more people have ID’s on the collars and / or micro-chipped we could get dogs back to the owners a lot quicker and sooner.”

FANNIN COUNTY EMERGENCY MANAGEMENT AGENCY AND FANNIN COUNTY FIRE DEPARTMENT

Fannin County Emergency Management Agency (EMA) Deputy Director Darrell Payne and Fannin County Fire Department (FCFD) Fire Chief Larry Thomas updated the BOC and residents on the busy year the departments had.

“Last year we had a busy call season,” said Payne before giving the statistics of 911 calls in Fannin County.

The EMA / EMS received 3,641 911 calls in 2018. There were an additional 1,115 non emergency calls that the department handled.

According to Thomas the FCFD responded to 416 fire calls, nine structure fires, three commercial fires, and one chimney fire.

“Several years ago we had several chimney fires. We were looking at anywhere from 12 to 15 on a given year,” Thomas spoke on the importance of having chimneys inspected, a step that can easily help to prevent a home fire. “Now these numbers have gotten down and I’m hoping that it’s our education that we are spreading throughout the county as far as cleaning chimneys. Right now is the most dangerous time of the year.”

Thomas explained that most chimneys are now prefabricated. Fires in these chimneys can easily spread to structures such as attics and rooftops.

Fannin County, Georgia, Blue Ridge, Board of Commissioners, Chairman, Post One Commissioner, Post Two Comissioner, Stan Helton, Earl Johnson, Glenn Patterson, Departments, Department Heads, Update, Blue Ridge Mountains Arts Association, BRMAA, Land Development, Animal Control, Emergency Management Agency, Fire Department, Parks and Recreation, Public Works, Director, Animal Control Officer, Chief Officer, Fire Chief, Deputy Director, Fannin County Attorney, Nichole Potzauf, Marie Woody, John Drullinger, Darrell Payne, Larry Thomas, Eddie O'Neal, Zack Ratcliff

Fannin County rescuers working to bring an injured fisherman to safety.

EMA / EMS also received two new ambulances which were placed in the Dial section of Fannin County, and hope to obtain a new ambulance in 2019 to replace one currently located at Station 4 in McCaysville.

Both Thomas and Payne reported that emergency calls are on the rise in the county, and Thomas attributes many of these calls taking place from people exploring the outdoors in our area: “We’re having more and more trail calls.”

Post 1 Commissioner Earl Johnson spoke of the importance of residents in Fannin County marking their homes and properties with signage that is easily visible to emergency crews: “A lot of people get black and black just blends in.”

Blue reflective number signs can be purchased at Kevin Panter Insurance. These signs, usually placed at the beginning of driveways, are clearly and highly visible which saves time for responders during an emergency situation.

A portion of the money received from the purchase of these signs goes directly back to the Fannin County EMS department.

“It does help. It really does. It reflects, it’s right at the end of the driveway,” Thomas said speaking of the blue signs available for purchase to the public.

“We have just recently moved into our new facility and we are very proud of it,” Payne spoke of the progress taking place at the new Fannin County Public Safety Complex, “and we want to thank the commissioners, you all for supporting us on that. It’s something we’ve needed for a long time. I think it’s something that the people, the county, can be proud of also.”

FANNIN COUNTY PARKS AND RECREATION

The Fannin County Parks and Recreation Department had a successful year. Many new programs were added to benefit those living in Fannin County and those visiting.

In 2018, 820 children participated in some kind of youth activity offered by the department.

The third annual Basketball Christmas Tournament also brought in large numbers for the county. Sixty-six teams participated in the three day tournament which took place Dec. 26-28. A total of 116 games were played with an average of 2,000 in attendance throughout each day.

“We had a kid playing on the Forsyth team and FetchYourNews, they broadcast it live through Youtube and we had a dad who was a marine,” Fannin County Parks and Recreation Director Eddie O’Neal spoke of how the tournament had international attention in 2018, “He got in contact with us and said he appreciated it. It was the first time he saw his kid play basketball in two years. It was amazing to be able to provide that to someone.”

Fannin County, Georgia, Blue Ridge, Board of Commissioners, Chairman, Post One Commissioner, Post Two Comissioner, Stan Helton, Earl Johnson, Glenn Patterson, Departments, Department Heads, Update, Blue Ridge Mountains Arts Association, BRMAA, Land Development, Animal Control, Emergency Management Agency, Fire Department, Parks and Recreation, Public Works, Director, Animal Control Officer, Chief Officer, Fire Chief, Deputy Director, Fannin County Attorney, Nichole Potzauf, Marie Woody, John Drullinger, Darrell Payne, Larry Thomas, Eddie O'Neal, Zack Ratcliff

One of the many games hosted during the Parks and Recreation Christmas Basketball Tournament.

Events like this tournament have large economic impacts on the county as whole. Visitors stay in hotels, rent cabins, eat at local restaurants, shop in locally owned stores, and many times plan to come back to our area for a second visit.

Parks and Recreation brought in $57,078.43 in youth concession sales, $52,257.60 in admission fees, and $59,574 in registrations in 2018. Pavillion rentals at parks added an additional $7,775, along with nonresident gym use fees for $3,051, after school programs at $20,860, summer day camp an additional $20,556.25, and $30, 568 food grant for summer day camp was obtained. Major programs accounted for approximately $251, 721.23, bringing a grand revenue total to approximately $280,000.

“That comes from tons of volunteers in the county. People that volunteer to help with programs, volunteer to coach, or volunteer to tutor with our after school program. We really do appreciate all the help,” Post 1 Commissioner Earl Johnson spoke of the Parks and Recreation Department’s success.

Johnson added, “The complaints I’ve received have been very minimal and what that tells me is you’re running the programs the way the should be ran and handling problems the way they should be handled. I appreciate you doing that.”

“Being in sports myself and education, the job you do with the young kids is very commendable,” Post 2 Commissioner Glenn Patterson complimented the work being done by the department.

Fannin County Chairman Stan Helton added to this, “I think the public, I hope they understand, certainly the parents do, what a relationship our Recreation Department is. I mean it’s for everyone, young and old alike.”

O’Neal shared plans to to begin senior programs in 2019: “Starting in February we will start a Silver Sneakers program for active senior adults. We have an employee trained to handle that exercise program that will take place two times a week.”

This new Silver Sneakers program will be an exercise based program specially geared towards an older crowd. The class size, initially, will accommodate 10 to 15 people.

Next up for Parks and Recreation will be a restroom remodel at their main facility. Commissioners voted unanimously to move forward with a bid from Wolfcreek Builders, LLC. in the amount of $50,075.

This remodel would include a metal roof, hardy plank siding, tiling the interior space, all new fixtures, and metal doors. The contract is for labor only. The county will supply materials.

Heating and air for the newly remodeled space will take place in a separate bid.

FANNIN COUNTY PUBLIC WORKS

Zack Ratcliff, Director of Public Works in Fannin County, has not only managed to cut the department’s expenses by close to $1,000,000 in just two years but his management has also led the Public Works department to more than double productivity in many areas.

In 2016 the Public Works department had 53 employees with a budget of $1,826,505 in payroll alone. The number of employees dramatically decreased by 2017 to 35. This brought payroll expenditures down to $1,308,744.

Fannin County, Georgia, Blue Ridge, Board of Commissioners, Chairman, Post One Commissioner, Post Two Comissioner, Stan Helton, Earl Johnson, Glenn Patterson, Departments, Department Heads, Update, Blue Ridge Mountains Arts Association, BRMAA, Land Development, Animal Control, Emergency Management Agency, Fire Department, Parks and Recreation, Public Works, Director, Animal Control Officer, Chief Officer, Fire Chief, Deputy Director, Fannin County Attorney, Nichole Potzauf, Marie Woody, John Drullinger, Darrell Payne, Larry Thomas, Eddie O'Neal, Zack Ratcliff

The Public Works crew taking care of the demo of Fire Station 1 in downtown Blue Ridge.

By 2018 employee total for the department sits at 36 with a payroll of $1,289,868. This alone has brought a little over $500,000 in savings to taxpayers each year.

In the last year, roughly 117 miles of road have been re-striped, 12 miles of road have been paved, 25 miles of road have been chip and sealed, the Aska Transfer Station also received chip and seal, as well as the Recreation Center parking area, 28 culverts have been installed, 600 road signs have been cleaned and straightened, and 649 new road signs were created for use throughout the county.

Johnson commented on how this kind of productivity saves money for residents: “The numbers that I see that aren’t reflected in these numbers, of other savings, is when you chip and seal a road, that is that many roads we’re not having to gravel, to grade or to maintain, other than clogged ditches and what have you. So really it’s hard to put a number on that (indirect savings).”

While the payroll is the most dramatic of the savings, other areas have improved in expenditures as well. The Fuel Master system was installed to track fuel use leading to greater accountability, through negotiations with various vendors the county is now receiving 2-10 percent discounts on its bills, and a new uniform provider was found that can provide uniforms at half the cost that the county was previously paying.

Ratcliff credits the success of the Public Works department to the employees in it and stated of the workers, “My crew is an efficient crew. Everybody’s professional.”

Johnson spoke of the dramatic affect one department can have on Fannin County as a whole, “These numbers right here is what keeps Fannin County’s millage rate the lowest in the state.”

“I think this is a great example of being able to professionally manage a department and do it effectively,” Helton added his thoughts on the accomplishments, “That’s real money. That’s big time money.”

The 2017 audit showed the initially savings of the now more efficient Public Works department as being $999,333.

 

Fetch Your News is a hyper local news outlet that attracts more than 300,000 page views and 3.5 million impressions per month in Dawson, Lumpkin, White, Fannin, Gilmer, Pickens, Union, Towns and Murray counties as well as Cherokee County in N.C. FYNTV attracts approximately 15,000 viewers per week and reaches between 15,000 to 60,000 per week on our Facebook page. For the most effective, least expensive local advertising, call 706-276-6397 or email us at advertise@FetchYourNews.com

Author

Natalie Kissel

Natalie@FetchYourNews.com

Fannin County Fire Department grateful for public support

Community, Fannin County EMA/EMS, News

Blue Ridge, Ga. – The Fannin County Fire Department along with the Fannin County Volunteer Firefighter Department would like to give a huge thank you to the public for their support and show what the donations provide for the citizens of Fannin County.

In an impressive display the Fire Department laid out equipment purchased in recent years that were directly funded from donations collected by the volunteer firefighters.

Fannin County, Fire Department, Volunteer Firefighters, Fire and Rescue Chief, Larry Thomas, Kevin Panter, Donations, Equipment, Personal Protection Equipment, PPE, turnout gear, bunker gear, Jaws of Life, Edraulics, TIC, Thermal Imaging Camera, River Boat, Rescue Engine, Vehicle Stabilization Struts, Rescue RAM, telescopic RAM

Rescue 2, the Volunteer Firefighters’ largest purchase made through public donations.

“We’ve been blessed here in the county for the last 3 years,” volunteer firefighter Kevin Panter said of the public’s donations, “it’s either been right at $100,000 or over $100,000 (per year), so the citizens have been very good.”

Through the volunteer firefighters’ mail-out program, in which those with Fannin County addresses receive a mailer asking for their support, the department has been able to purchase a number of life saving pieces of equipment.

Volunteer firefighters then decide what items and equipment is needed to assist the county “over and above” what is already funded. Once purchased all the equipment becomes county property.

One item that is purchased regularly through volunteer firefighter funds is Personal Protection Equipment (PPE), also known as “Turnout Gear” and “Bunker Gear”. This is the protective gear worn by firefighters during emergency calls.

Panter said of the gear, “It takes over $3000 just to get a firefighter with minimal essential equipment.”

It is estimated that through these donated funds, the volunteer firefighters suit up between five to ten members of the volunteer group annually.

It is not just these smaller purchases that public donations has funded, as Panter pointed out, while showing a river boat that had also been acquired in recent years: “It’s a low water river boat. We run probably 10 to 15 calls a year of people stranded in the river.”

“Our biggest purchase that the volunteers have ever made is Rescue 2,” Panter said as he pointed to a rescue truck parked in the bay of Fannin County’s new Public Safety Complex.

Fannin County, Fire Department, Volunteer Firefighters, Fire and Rescue Chief, Larry Thomas, Kevin Panter, Donations, Equipment, Personal Protection Equipment, PPE, turnout gear, bunker gear, Jaws of Life, Edraulics, TIC, Thermal Imaging Camera, River Boat, Rescue Engine, Vehicle Stabilization Struts, Rescue RAM, telescopic RAM

Fannin County Fire Department’s “river boat” made possible through public support.

Rescue 2 is housed at the Mineral Buff station and came with an approximate price tag of $78,000.

“That was truly bought by the volunteers, by the volunteer funds,” Panter added of the volunteers’ largest purchase.

Life saving equipment has also been updated through the volunteer firefighter funds. Among the tools purchased are Rescue Rams, or Telescopic Rams. This equipment, capable of pushing apart compressed areas such as metal that has been twisted in a vehicle accident, is used with cutters and spreaders to extricate victims of road traffic incidents or collapsed buildings.

Also among the vehicle rescue equipment were two sets of Vehicle Stabilization Struts, used commonly in the event of a vehicle rollover. A set of struts when purchased has a cost of $2,600.

In the last 30 days the fire department has been able to purchase an additional $68,000 worth of new equipment. A major portion of this cost, at $12,000 per piece, was in the purchase of three new eDraulic (electric/hydraulic) Extrication Tools, more commonly known as the Jaws of Life.

“That one right there is a combination tool. It spreads and it cuts,” Panter said explaining the benefits of the newly designed Jaws of Life.

The new, more compact version of the Jaws of Life is battery powered and capable of being operated by a single person. This is in contrast to the older, but still reliable version which is gas powered.

Older versions of the Jaws of Life are a bit more cumbersome for rescuers to use, with a bulkier mass, their setup and operation requires more time and personnel to employ.

“It can be a minimum of four minutes to eight minutes before we’re actually ready to start cutting on a car,” Panter said of the older version and added of the newly purchased equipment, “Now we get off the truck, get our gear, I grab that thing and as soon as I put it in my hand it’s working.”

Lastly, the volunteer firefighters purchased 18 new Thermal Imaging Cameras (TIC). These newer TICs are much smaller, lighter in weight and can attach to a firefighter’s PPE.

These TICs are valued at about $700 each, but through bundle purchasing the volunteer firefighters were able to get a discount on this price.

The compact, lightweight camera has two settings utilized by emergency personnel. The first of which is a type of temperature gauge allowing rescuers to search buildings for hot spots, which are particularly active parts of a fire or places where fire might still be active but is concealed.

Fannin County, Fire Department, Volunteer Firefighters, Fire and Rescue Chief, Larry Thomas, Kevin Panter, Donations, Equipment, Personal Protection Equipment, PPE, turnout gear, bunker gear, Jaws of Life, Edraulics, TIC, Thermal Imaging Camera, River Boat, Rescue Engine, Vehicle Stabilization Struts, Rescue RAM, telescopic RAM

New Thermal Imaging Cameras allow firefighters to “see through smoke” to locate victims.

A second setting allows rescuers to “see through the smoke”. Panter pointed out that this setting is particularly helpful when trying to locate victims, both human and animal, in a fire.

Fire and Rescue Chief Larry Thomas spoke of the donations and the staff of volunteer firefighters in Fannin County: “I can’t say enough for the volunteers and for the community to pull and actually give us donations, as to the way that we’ve been receiving them, it’s heartfelt.”

“The county stands behind us. We’ve got donations that actually come in from people in FL that has properties here. It is really tremendous the way the community does us when it comes to donations,” Thomas said expressing thanks on the department’s behalf, and added a personal thank you to the volunteers, “For the volunteers of the department their out there in the middle of the night, of the mornings, of the day. They’re always there, and it does, it helps out a lot.”

If you would like to make a donation to the Fannin County Volunteer Firefighter Fund, donations may be dropped off in person at the new Fannin County Public Safety Complex located on Windy Ridge Road in Blue Ridge, Ga. or you can make a donation through the Volunteer Firefighters annual mailer program.

Aluminum cans are also collected at Advanced Disposal waste collection and recycling facilities. The proceeds from the aluminum can collection directly fund the Fannin County Fire Department’s public educational outreach program.

 

Featured Photo : (L-R) Rob Ross Deputy Fire Chief, Sandy Walden Capt Station 5, Larry Thomas Fire & Rescue Chief, Tony Galloway Lt Station 1, Virginia Jones Volunteer Fire, Larry Waters Volunteer Fire, Bill Marsh Capt Station 13, Channing Johnstone Volunteer Fire, Jacob Queen Volunteer Fire, Kevin Panter Volunteer Fire, Robert Castlen Volunteer Fire, Bill Jones Volunteer Fire, Brad Beaver Volunteer Fire

 

Fetch Your News is a hyper local news outlet that attracts more than 300,000 page views and 3.5 million impressions per month in Dawson, Lumpkin, White, Fannin, Gilmer, Pickens, Union, Towns and Murray counties as well as Cherokee County in N.C. FYNTV attracts approximately 15,000 viewers per week and reaches between 15,000 to 60,000 per week on our Facebook page. For the most effective, least expensive local advertising, call 706-276-6397 or email us at advertise@FetchYourNews.com

Author

Natalie Kissel

Natalie@FetchYourNews.com

Fuel leak closes Davis Street

News

BLUE RIDGE, Ga. – The portion of Davis Street located between East Main Street and East First Street is currently closed due to a diesel fuel leak.

Shortly after 4 p.m., a semi-trailer suffered a ruptured fuel line on the side of Davis Street closest to East First Street.Blue Ridge, Fannin County, Georgia, Fire Department, City of Blue Ridge Police Department, Fannin County Sherrif's Office, Larry Thomas, East Main Street, East First Street, Davis Street, Diesel Fuel

Blue Ridge city crews as well as local law enforcement and officials from the fire department are on the scene to close off the street and direct traffic.

Crews from Atlanta are en route to help with clean up. Not only will the roadway need to be properly cleaned of any remaining chemicals from the initial spill, but neighboring yards will also have to be excavated to rid the area of contamination.

Fire Chief Larry Thomas is on the scene and said to expect the roadway to be closed for at least another three hours.

 

Fetch Your News is a hyper local news outlet that attracts more than 300,000 page views and 3.5 million impressions per month in Dawson, Lumpkin, White, Fannin, Gilmer, Pickens, Union, Towns and Murray counties as well as Cherokee County in N.C. FYNTV attracts approximately 15,000 viewers per week and reaches between 15,000 to 60,000 per week on our Facebook page. For the most effective, least expensive local advertising, call 706-276-6397 or email us at advertise@FetchYourNews.com

Author

Natalie Kissel

Natalie@FetchYourNews.com

Winter Storm Benji impacts Fannin County

Fannin County EMA/EMS, News

BLUE RIDGE, Ga. – Snow continues to fall on Fannin County as Winter Storm Benji makes its way out of our region. Residents around the county have reported anywhere from five to eight inches of snow, some reporting more in localized areas.

Fannin County, Blue Ridge, Mineral Bluff, Morgaton, McCaysville, Georgia, Winter Storm, Winter Weather, Snow, Fannin County Emergency Management Agency, EMA, Robert Graham, Lakewood Hwy, GA 60, GA 515, Glenda Higdon, Public Works, Zack Ratcliff, Fire Department, Larry Thomas

Roadways quickly became hazardous early this afternoon. Photo courtesy of Malinda Williams Bakara.

Fannin County Emergency Management Agency (EMA) Director Robert Graham says that we are in for more snowfall through the evening hours. Graham stated, “Forecasts are showing an additional one to three inches for our area.”

Power outages have been reported throughout the county today, and crews are working on restoring power to those without. Graham stated of the outages, “Several are out on the eastern side of our county, and up in the Dial area.”

Going into the night power outages and refreezing of roadways are of major concern. The roads cleared some today as temperatures slowly crept above freezing, but without wind or the sun to dry the roadways the water left behind is likely to turn into ice.

Director of Public Works Zack Ratcliff released a statement that he is expecting conditions to worsen as a significant refreeze with black ice will likely occur after dark as temperatures begin to fall into the 20s.

Ratcliff has six trucks dispatched throughout the county putting down salt and gravel mix to treat the roads, and three motor graders have been out working in locations such as Aska Road, Old Hwy. 76, and the Mobile and Madola roads area.

Fannin County, Blue Ridge, Mineral Bluff, Morgaton, McCaysville, Georgia, Winter Storm, Winter Weather, Snow, Fannin County Emergency Management Agency, EMA, Robert Graham, Lakewood Hwy, GA 60, GA 515, Glenda Higdon, Public Works, Zack Ratcliff, Fire Department, Larry Thomas

Five to eight inches of snow are being reported across the county. Photo courtesy of Suzanne Ponton.

EMA Director Robert Graham is now urging residents, “Please stay off the roads tonight, unless you absolutely need to get out. Try to stay put in the morning as well. After about 10 or 11 a.m. tomorrow, we hope the temperatures will get back up and melt some of this off.”

Fannin County Fire and Rescue Chief and EMA Deputy Director Larry Thomas spoke with FetchYourNews about area roadways and conditions. Thomas confirmed that his department has already responded to several calls today. Many of these calls involved stranded motorists and residents.

While some could not avoid getting out today, many citizens chose to prepare and stay indoors. Fannin County resident Glenda Higdon spoke of her preparation, “So far so good here. We are gathering water, charging phones and phone banks, brought in another load of wood and cooking food up. We have a wood heater, heat pumps and a generator.”

Fannin County, Blue Ridge, Mineral Bluff, Morgaton, McCaysville, Georgia, Winter Storm, Winter Weather, Snow, Fannin County Emergency Management Agency, EMA, Robert Graham, Lakewood Hwy, GA 60, GA 515, Glenda Higdon, Public Works, Zack Ratcliff, Fire Department, Larry Thomas

Glenda Higdons shared this photo of snowfall on her property.

Higdon added with a smile, “We also have a bobcat, tractor, battery chargers, as well! My hubby is a Vietnam Veteran and is not about to get stuck anywhere!”

“We’re both locals so when the blizzard came in 1993, (we) learned a lot about being prepared then (the hard way),” Higdon explained.

Whether prepared or not Winter Storm Benji has left its mark on the north Georgia mountains, and its effects will continue to be experienced in our area for the next couple of days.

Follow FetchYourNews for the latest information about Winter Storm Benji in our area.

 

Fetch Your News is a hyper local news outlet that attracts more than 300,000 page views and 3.5 million impressions per month in Dawson, Lumpkin, White, Fannin, Gilmer, Pickens, Union, Towns and Murray counties as well as Cherokee County in N.C. FYNTV attracts approximately 15,000 viewers per week and reaches between 15,000 to 60,000 per week on our Facebook page. For the most effective, least expensive local advertising, call 706-276-6397 or email us at advertise@FetchYourNews.com

Author

Natalie Kissel

Natalie@FetchYourNews.com

Fannin County Board of Commissioners- Meeting Agenda

Legal Notice

AGENDA
Regular Meeting
July 11, 2017 5:15 p.m.
Jury Assembly Room – Third Floor

OPENING REGULAR MEETING:

  1. Invocation and Pledge of Allegiance

OLD BUSINESS:

  1. Approve minutes of June 27, 2017.

PUBLIC COMMENTARY: 30-minute maximum

Do not misconstrue this as a question and answer session with the board.

Limit 3 minutes per person. Please state name and address before comments. All comments should be addressed to the Chairman.

NEW BUSINESS:

  1. Variance Request – Timothy P. and Jeanie L. May
  2. Variance Request – Beaslebow LLC
  3. Marie Woody – Land Development Report
  4. Zack Ratcliff – Road Department Report
  5. Eddie O’Neal – Rec. Department Report
  6. Consent Agenda – Fire Department

EXECUTIVE SESSION:

  1. Executive Session (if necessary)

CLOSING:

  1. Adjournment

 

 

The Fannin County Board of Commissioners meetings are held every second and fourth Tuesday at 6:00 p.m. in the Jury Assembly Room – Third Floor of the Fannin County Courthouse.

Agendas are posted to the County website within 24 hours of the next scheduled meeting

This agenda has been approved by the Chairman and is subject to change at his discretion.  If you have questions or concerns, contact Chairman Helton at shelton@fannincountyga.org

FetchYourNews.com - Dedicated to serve the needs of the community. Provide a source of real news-Dependable Information-Central to the growth and success of our Communities. Strive to encourage, uplift, warn, entertain, & enlighten our readers/viewers- Honest-Reliable-Informative.

News - Videos - TV - Marketing - Website Design - Commercial Production - Consultation

Search

FetchYourNews.com - Citizen Journalists - A place to share “Your” work. Send us “Your” information or tips - 706.276.NEWs (6397) 706.889.9700 chief@FetchYourNews.com

Back to Top