Residents Ask Fannin County Water Authority to Intervene

Community, Featured

Three different couples approached the Fannin County Water Authority (FCWA) to request that the FCWA intervene with their water service provider Appalachian Water. Deer Crest Overlook and Weaver Creek Mountain Property are connected to two congested wells in the area.

The issue here, is that these wells are only supposed to supply between 10-15 houses and now both wells are connected to over 60 homes—some full-time residents, some rentals, and some seasonal homes. Due to an influx of people residing in the area, around the beginning of July every year the full-time residents lose access to water for five or six days due to the failing of these water sources.

Water is being charged between thirty and forty dollars a month. It’s been said that once someone charges for water, the water must be tested regularly for contaminants and to ensure that the water is drinkable.

Fannin County Attorney Lynn Doss asked, “Okay, what we have to know before you guys can do anything is who owns the well, if the people that own the well are the same as the people who own the system, what kind of right-aways you have or don’t have. Do y’all pay somebody monthly?”

All three couples answered, “Yes. We pay Appalachian Water.”

Doss then replied, “Well the question is are you paying for water? Are you paying for water and service? Are you paying for water, service, and maintenance? Because until you have those questions answered we wouldn’t even know if we could start to help you.”

Local resident Bob Flanders responded, “We pay for water. There is no maintenance fee.”

FCWA Vice Chairman Larry Chapman replied, “My question, too, is that if they have Deer Crest on there now and it’s across the street then, I mean, have they done this legally? Because if they hadn’t contacted Environmental Protection Division (EPD) about this—when you add customers on a small system like this usually the biggest thing is storage. You’ll have a well that’s 20-30 gallons per minute and you have to adjust the storage, it’ll put out the water to treat ‘em but you got to have the storage, so it does it 24 hours a day 7 days a week.”

In the end, the FCWA instructed the residents to contact the health department and EPD so that they can follow the proper channels to getting their water issues fixed. FCWA explained that they cannot get involved unless they are instructed to do so.

Update: Boil advisory for McCaysville, Copperhill water customers

News

McCAYSVILLE, Ga. – UPDATE: In addition to McCaysville water customers, the city of Copperhill has issued a boil advisory for its water customers. According to Amber Brooks, city clerk for Copperhill, the advisory stems from low levels in the city’s water tank. Brooks added the city is hauling water from the Copper Basin Utility District water system in Ducktown, Tennessee, to fill the city tank.

Water customers of the city of McCaysville, which supplies water to the Copperhill water system, also remain under a boil advisory that was originally issued Friday.

 

McCAYSVILLE, Ga. – The Fannin County Emergency Management Agency (EMA) announced a boil advisory Friday, Jan. 5, for McCaysville water customers.

“Due to freezing pipes and low tank levels, all customers on the McCaysville Water System are under a boil advisory until further notice,” the Fannin EMA advisory read.

The McCaysville water system has experienced water main breaks in the past few days due to extremely cold temperatures. This, along with customers leaving faucets dripping overnight to prevent freezing, has led to low tank levels at the city’s water system tank.

Continue to follow FetchYourNews for updates on the water situation in the twin cities.

 

 

Author

Jason Beck

Born in Merrillville, Indiana, raised in Cleveland, Tennessee, and currently resides in Copperhill, Tennessee. Graduated from Bradley Central High School in 1996 and attended the University of Tennessee at Chattanooga, eventually earning a B.A. and M.A. in English. Hobbies include hiking, camping and fly-fishing. Interests include baseball, hockey and cliff jumping.

Details emerge on Blue Ridge water outage

News

BLUE RIDGE, Ga. – New details have surfaced concerning Tuesday evening’s water outage in downtown Blue Ridge.

According to Rebecca Harkins, director of Blue Ridge Water and Sewer department, a contractor doing a road bore beneath state Route 515 near East Highland Street in an effort to install a two-inch water service line struck and ruptured a six-inch water main line Tuesday afternoon.

Harkins stated the incident occurred when the bore struck an unknown line under Hwy. 515 as it was being backed out. She added that the ruptured water main was eight-feet deep below at least a foot of pavement and was not detected by sonar equipment last week during preliminary work site preparations.

A ruptured water main near East Highland Street and state Route 515 resulted in a widespread water outage for downtown Blue Ridge water customers Tuesday evening.

Water service was restored to affected customers at about 1:30 a.m. Wednesday morning as crews removed a portion of pavement near the shoulder of Hwy. 515 to access the point of rupture, Harkins stated. Later Wednesday, the two-inch line water line was successfully installed and clean up of the site began.

Harkins said Johnson Paving will perform the pavement repair on the roadway after the clean up process is completed.

“The city of Blue Ridge would like to thank all of the utility crews that worked till 1:30 a.m. in the freezing temperatures to make sure water was restored to the customers. The city would also like to thank Holloway Trenching for stopping by and offering help,” Harkins said of the repair and clean up efforts.

 

Fetch Your News is a hyper local news outlet that attracts more than 300,000 page views and 3.5 million impressions per month in Dawson, Lumpkin, White, Fannin, Gilmer, Pickens, Union, Towns and Murray counties as well as Cherokee County in N.C. FYNTV attracts approximately 15,000 viewers per week and reaches between 15,000 to 60,000 per week on our Facebook page. For the most effective, least expensive local advertising, call 706-276-6397 or email us at advertise@FetchYourNews.com

Author

Jason Beck

Born in Merrillville, Indiana, raised in Cleveland, Tennessee, and currently resides in Copperhill, Tennessee. Graduated from Bradley Central High School in 1996 and attended the University of Tennessee at Chattanooga, eventually earning a B.A. and M.A. in English. Hobbies include hiking, camping and fly-fishing. Interests include baseball, hockey and cliff jumping.

UPDATE: Boil advisory lifted in McCaysville, Copperhill

News

McCAYSVILLE, Ga. – UPDATE: Amber Brooks, city clerk for the city of Copperhill, confirmed Saturday, Jan. 20, that the water boil advisory for Copperhill, Tennessee, water customers has been lifted after bacteriological tests have ensured the safety the town’s water.

On Friday, McCaysville lifted its own boil advisory for its water customers following sampling and testing from the Georgia Environmental Protection Division (EPD), which found that system’s water to be safe for consumption without boiling.

 

According to the Fannin County Emergency Management Agency (EMA) alert system, the water boil advisory for McCaysville water customers has been lifted by the Georgia Environmental Protection Division (EPD). McCaysville water customers may now consume water without having to boil it first to ensure its safety.

As for Copperhill, Tennessee, which receives its water from the McCaysville water system, City Clerk Amber Brooks stated a boil advisory remains in effect for that town’s water customers as Copperhill has only been able to pump a limited amount of water from the McCaysville system and water from the Copperhill water tanks has not yet been sampled and tested.

Continue to follow FetchYourNews for updates on the water situation in the twin cities.

 

Fetch Your News is a hyper local news outlet that attracts more than 300,000 page views and 3.5 million impressions per month in Dawson, Lumpkin, White, Fannin, Gilmer, Pickens, Union, Towns and Murray counties as well as Cherokee County in N.C. FYNTV attracts approximately 15,000 viewers per week and reaches between 15,000 to 60,000 per week on our Facebook page. For the most effective, least expensive local advertising, call 706-276-6397 or email us at advertise@FetchYourNews.com

Author

Jason Beck

Born in Merrillville, Indiana, raised in Cleveland, Tennessee, and currently resides in Copperhill, Tennessee. Graduated from Bradley Central High School in 1996 and attended the University of Tennessee at Chattanooga, eventually earning a B.A. and M.A. in English. Hobbies include hiking, camping and fly-fishing. Interests include baseball, hockey and cliff jumping.

Well Water Testing

Outdoors

Well Water Testing

By:  Eddie Ayers, County Extension Agent

For the most part, north Georgia did not see extreme flooding as a result of hurricane Irma as did other areas of the state, but it does bring to mind the importance of well safety. Wells that were overtopped by flood waters need to be flushed and tested for bacteria because of the potential danger of contaminants being washed into the well. UGA Extension Water Resource Management and Policy Specialist Gary Hawkins recommends pumping and flushing a minimum of 2 or 3 times the well volume to clear the system. This water should be discarded from an outside faucet and not from an inside faucet to bypass the home’s septic tank. After pumping the water, the well should be shock chlorinated then the well should be flushed again until there is no smell of chlorine bleach and, like before, the flushing step should be done through an outdoor faucet to bypass the septic system. This highly chlorinated water, if discharged to the septic tank, could cause problems with the bacterial colonies in the septic tank.

After the well is shock-chlorinated, flushed and the chlorine smell is gone (about two weeks), the well water should be tested for bacteria. Families can get their well water tested using their local county UGA Extension office.  Until the test for bacteria comes back, Hawkins strongly suggests that water for cooking or drinking be boiled before consumption. If the well contains bacteria the report will explain how to treat the well.

To calculate the volume of water that should be pumped from a well, use the following calculation.  Most of the well casings in this area are 6 inches so the factor for that size is 1.47.  That means that there are 1.47 gallons of water for every foot in depth.  Multiply the depth of water in the well by this factor to determine how much water is in the well. If your casing is not 6 inches, contact me in the Gilmer County UGA Extension office and we can get the right factor.

There are several methods to determine how much water you have flushed out, but the one that I use is to calculate how long it takes to fill a 5 gallon bucket.  Divide that time by 5 to get the output per minute.  Using this figure you can determine how many minutes you need to run the water to flush the number of gallons of water that was determined in the previous calculation. A couple of methods can be used to determine the depth of water in a well. If you can see the water in the well, lower a heavy object tied to a string down the well and measure the length of the string until you see the object touch the water. In a deep well, lower a heavy object like above until you hear the object hit the water and measure the length of string. If you cannot see the object hit the water, another way (but less accurate) is to drop a small stone into the well and count or time the seconds it takes for the stone to hit the water (you will have to listen closely for this.) Multiply the number of seconds by 32.2 and that will let you know how far the water is below the surface. Knowing the depth of the well and the depth from surface, subtract the two to get the height of the water column for calculating the volume of water in the well.

An example of this calculation is if you have a well that is 300 feet deep and the water level is 25 feet from the surface, subtracting 25 from 300 equals 275 which means you have 275 feet of water in the well.  Multiply 275 by 1.47 to get the gallons in the well.  That figure is 404.25 gallons.  Using a factor of 3 pints per 100 gallons, you would need to apply a little over 12 pints of chlorine bleach in the well.

If you have any questions about this process or for more information on well water testing, contact me at the Gilmer County UGA Extension office.

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Candidate Nathan Fitts – Why Infrastructure needs to be a Priority in the City of Blue Ridge

Politics

I think we all breathed a sigh of relief when Irma came through Blue Ridge doing relatively little damage. But, what if it had lived up to all the dire predictions? Would the city have been ready?

We know that our emergency management team works hard to ensure readiness when needed. You may have seen them performing practice drills that encompass a variety of possible disaster situations. It is comforting to know we have a fine group of men and women at the ready when we need them.

But, is our city infrastructure ready for the next disaster? We have seen the flooding on Ada Street and on W. Main Street after it rains. One can only imagine the damage that would be done to property in the event of a major weather event. And how difficult would it be for our emergency responders to get to people in need if the roads are impassable?

If elected, one of my first priorities will be to address our outdated infrastructure. We need to know what, where, and why we are having these issues.

Once we have answered those questions, we move on to how we are going to remedy the situation. These are hard questions that will require hard answers, and elected officials that are willing to tackle these issues.

Our city is beautiful, indeed. We have lovely public spaces, a fine playground, a renovated train depot. Our newly completed downtown streetscape makes our city even more tourist friendly. All these are reasons that Blue Ridge is included in so many “best of” articles.

 

 

 

 

 

But, it won’t matter how beautiful our city looks if it is not built on a sound infrastructure. We must address this issue now, or pay the consequences later.

 

Your vote for me will be a vote for someone not afraid to tackle the tough issues!

Boil Water Alert for Blue Ridge Water customers. Higher elevations may be without water soon, others should conserve

News

Blue Ridge, GA.  There is a water emergency in the City of Blue Ridge.  The city has requested all city residents to please conserve water until further notice.  Please do not wash cars, water lawns, or use any water which isn’t absolutely necessary.

Fannin EMA:  Blue Ridge Water System is experiencing problems with both pumps at the treatment plant and supplies of water in storage tanks are beginning to get low. All non-essential water usage should be stopped until further notice. A BOIL WATER ORDER has been put into effect by the City of Blue Ridge. Officials are working on getting water tankers to several locations where customers can pick up water in their own containers until the problem is resolved and we will post those locations when available. For updates on the situation, please visit the City of Blue Ridge Facebook page or call 706-632-2091, ext. 1. Thank you for your patience.

Related: Water Emergency in City of Blue Ridge

Water Emergency in the City of Blue Ridge – Conserve Water

News

Blue Ridge, GA.  There is a water emergency in the City of Blue Ridge.  The city has requested all city residents to please conserve water until further notice.  Please do not wash cars, water lawns, or use any water which isn’t absolutely necessary.

FANNIN CO EMA: Due to water plant malfunction, Blue Ridge Water System customers are asked to stop all non-essential water usage.  The City of Blue Ridge is experiencing a water emergency.  The water treatment plant is currently shut down due to electrical/mechanical issues.  We are working diligently to solve the problem.  We are asking customers to stop all non-essential water usage such as outdoor watering, car washing, pressure washing and pool fillings.  This is an effort to extend the life of the water left in our storage tanks for essential needs.  We appreciate any and all cooperation in this matter.

FetchYourNews.com spoke with City of Blue Ridge Mayor Donna Whitener early Saturday morning, August 5th, who explained the city is experiencing an issue at the water plant.  Whitener wanted to make sure residents were aware and ask to please conserve water until the issue is resolved.  FYN will update as more information becomes available.

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